radio plays

Notes From the Huntley Project

A radio comedy play trilogy

Listen to these radio plays on iTunes' podcast by searching: "jay bird comedy plays"

  • Written & Directed by: Jay Kettering

  • Performed by: Bernie O’Connor

  • Recorded by: Beth Anne Austein in the studios of Montana Public Radio

  • Edited and produced by: Chérie Newman with additional post-production by Cole Grant

  • Original music was created and performed for this play by Beth Cavaliere, Joe Bauch, Vic Stampley, and Joey Cregg

  • Directed by: Teresa Waldorf

  • Performed by:

    • David Mills-Low: Narrator, Jaybird

    • Rebecca Schaffer: Mrs. Andsum, Miss Glowtier, Mom

    • Will Tilton: Stewart Pie, random kid, George Georgie, Rodger, Charlie Sheriff

    • Jessica Adam: Miss Flip, Nurse, Mrs. Bomb

    • Aaron Roos: Joe Shramski, Greg Bomb, Bill, Dad, Highway Patrolman

  • Recorded by: Beth Anne Austein in the studios of Montana Public Radio

  • Edited and produced by: Chérie Newman with additional post-production by Cole Grant

  • Original music was created and performed for this play by Beth Cavaliere, Joe Bauch, Vic Stampley, and Joey Cregg

  • Illustration by: Steve Fanelli

  • Directed by: Teresa Waldorf

  • Performed by:

    • David Mills-Low: Narrator, Jaybird

    • Anne-Marie Williams: Carlita Milkey

    • Cody Hysolp: Mr. Oltroggie, Kenny Finch

    • Reid Reimers: Dad, Adolphus Johansson aka Apple Juice

    • Teresa Waldorf: Nardo Aquino, random kids

  • Recorded by: Beth Anne Austein in the studios of Montana Public Radio

  • Edited and produced by: Chérie Newman with additional post-production by Cole Grant

  • Original music was created and performed for this play by Beth Cavaliere, Joe Bauch, Vic Stampley, and Joey Cregg

  • Painting by: Tom Zavitz

Episode #1

My Dad and

Pre-Socratic Thought

My Dad and Pre-Socratic Thought won Best Audio Play at the 2016 Moondance International Film Festival in Boulder, Colorado.

In this monologue, a man recalls the crazy stories his father told him, and within those stories he attempts to explain his father, which requires he explain about the peanut butter torture, discipline by prosthetic arm, and a trustworthy drunk. After you hear the world’s greatest oatmeal salesman tell the story of the turpentine miracle, you may find yourself pondering the stories you remember from your own father. This can be a very philosophical thing to do, because the stories of the father always shed light on the story of the storyteller.

Episode #2

How I Learned

To Tell Time

In this play, comedy and tragedy ride double. You see, the inability to tell time has forced six-year-old Jaybird to become an outlaw and to face a darkness that did not exist to him before now. After stabbing his first-grade teacher in the thigh with the big hand of Clock Man, he is living life on the run. The loud librarian is sympathetic to his plight, but ultimately exposes his hideout and Jaybird must pay for his crime of ignorance. Luckily, Jaybird’s trusted friend and mentor, George Georgie, is there to help him navigate through the strange landscape that is eastern Montana—where playgrounds are the size of small towns and foot-eating devils and floorboard angels reveal secrets of life and death. Only one thing is for sure in this odyssey to understand the ticking of the clock—time is on their side.

Episode #3

The Church of Pancakes

Emotion battles ethics in this action-packed caper. Nine-year-old Jaybird and his partner in crime, Kenny, love the sound of a burning fuse and the smell of gunpowder—on the Fourth of July, they get high just inhaling the air. But coming up with the perfect plan to rob the local fireworks stand is going to be harder than they expected. Perhaps because in their world, moon landings and tripping on psychedelic dog food are no more unusual than becoming fireproof with a kiss. And the instigator of this crime of passion, the bewitching ten-year-old Mexican migrant worker, Carlita Milkey, only makes the task of distinguishing the real from the imagined all the more difficult. Listen in as the fifty-three-year-old narrator recalls his nine-year-old self, revealing what a kid will do for love and what the love of a memory can do to the heart and mind of a storyteller.

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